Fulwell Windmill restoration and refurbishment has now entered the final phase, and will see the iconic landmark restored to its former glory later this year.

Scaffolding has been erected to provide health and safety for the workforce, and also protect the structure while the temporary flat roof is removed. This will then allow the essential repair works to be carried out in the next months.

windmill fulwell

Fulwell Windmill undercover

The new cap and sails have been constructed and will be transported to the site later this year, and subsequently installed by qualified engineers.

Sun FM reported that the scaffolding was in place on the exterior of the building, but it will be business as usual for SNCBC (Sunderland North Community Business Centre) who now run the visitor centre and newly redeveloped Fulwell tearooms.

The new cap and sails have been constructed and will be transported to the site later this year, and subsequently installed by qualified engineers.

Sun FM reported that the scaffolding was in place on the exterior of the building, but it will be business as usual for SNCBC (Sunderland North Community Business Centre) who now run the visitor centre and newly redeveloped Fulwell tearooms.

fulwell windmill tearoom

Fuwell Windmill tearooms – Extremely pleasant and very good food

Sunderland City Council Portfolio for Public Health, Wellness and Culture, Councillor John Kelly said:
“It is great to see the next stage of work begin, and we hope everyone will bear with us and continue to visit the visitor centre while work continues.

“Returning Fulwell Windmill to the historic landmark it has been for generations is quite an achievement, skilled craftsmen are using centuries old techniques to re-instate the cap, fantail and sails.

“The progress being made is testament to the hard work and partnership of all those involved in this fantastic conservation project, and the end result will be another visible celebration of our shared cultural heritage for the city.”

The historic Fulwell Windmill will be given support and technical expertise by millwrights and architects involved in the restoration work, and will also be joined by representatives from Historic England who are providing additional support and funding to the restoration project.

Kate Wilson, Historic England’s Principal Heritage At Risk Adviser for the North East said:
“Fulwell Windmill has been a significant feature of the Wearside landscape since 1806 and is a much loved local landmark. Historic England is delighted to be working with Sunderland City Council to help preserve this remarkable structure and secure its future removal from the Heritage At Risk register.”

It’s hoped that work on the historic building will be completed by November, with an official re-opening ceremony in time for Christmas.


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